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A three-dimensional array of self assembled nanowires formed from dimerized spheres.

When we want to make a machine, we normally buy some nuts and bolts and parts and screw everything together. Nature works differently- biological "machines" assemble themselves. The intrinsic interactions within a biological motor, a cell membrane, or a developing embryo work together collectively to produce a very complex functional structure. Researchers are just beginning to learn how to use the principles of self assembly to design new structures at the nanoscale.

Publications

2003 · 2007 · All
H. Saavedra, C. M. Barbu, A. A. Dameron, T. Mullen, V. H. Crespi and P. S. Weiss, "1-Adamantanethiolate Monolayer Displacement Kinetics Follow a Universal Form," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 10741 – 10746 (2007) Abstract/Comments
D. Stucke and V. H. Crespi, "Predictions of New Crystalline States for Assemblies of Nanoparticles: Perovskite Analogues and 3-D Arrays of Self-Assembled Nanowires," Nanoletters 3, 1183 – 1186 (2003) Abstract/Comments

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

V. H. Crespi : Self Assembly: Nature does the work